Carmina Burana’s  soloist Henry Choo (Tenor) share some thoughts about his life and also about the concert with us in September

Tenor – Henry Choo

“Playing the role of the dying swan (or “roasted Peking duck”, as Marc Taddei and I have redubbed it), presents many challenges”

I first came across Carmina Burana during secondary school, having performed excerpts of the work as a violinist. It’s a work that evokes  differing  emotions in me – from the feeling of awe at  the amazing orchestration to that of fear of the O Fortuna theme commonly used in horror movies, most notably The Omen.

Playing the role of the dying swan (or “roasted Peking duck”, as Marc Taddei and I have redubbed it), presents many challenges. The most obvious are the stratospheric notes without opportunity to warm the voice up beforehand. That said, Orff writes the piece with drama in mind, and the high- pitched setting of the movement reflects the searing pain felt as the swan is slowly roasted over a rotating spit.

Marc Taddei and I recorded my début solo album, BRIGHT POET, earlier this year and have a great working relationship. James Clayton and I have performed numerous operas together in Australia prior to his relocation to Wellington. Working alongside Natasha Wilson will be a new experience for me, as well as with Dunedin Symphony Orchestra. It will be my first visit to Dunedin and I am very much looking forward to it.